Foto Pixabay

Our skin and our body can repair a lot of damage itself through our innate self-healing abilities. A skinned knee, a cut on your finger, or a sprained ankle are not grounds for consulting a doctor. After a few days, the wounds heal without any outside intervention. However, only biological beings possess this ability to heal themselves. A torn garment will not repair itself, unfortunately. Scientists have now developed a material that can repair itself in a matter of seconds.

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart, Germany, and the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in the USA have managed to do this by altering the nanostructure of a new type of ductile material “until it can fully recover its structure and properties after being cut or perforated.” This material, which has the potential to revolutionize research in the field of soft robotics, was inspired by cuttlefish. According to these scientists, this material would enable many applications in a world “where robots have to cope with dynamic and unpredictable environments.”

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About the author

Author profile picture Petra Wiesmayer is a journalist and author who has conducted countless interviews with high-profile individuals and researched and written general entertainment, motorsports, and science articles for international publications. She is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.As an avid science fiction fan she is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.