© TUM Hyperloop

In July last year, the Hyperloop team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in Germany won for the fourth time in a row the international Hyperloop competition held in Los Angeles. The team’s pod reached a record speed of 482 kilometers per hour in the 1,200-meter long test vacuum tube on the grounds of SpaceX (as IO also reported). With this speed, the students have not quite reached their goal of exceeding the speed of sound. Which is why the researchers now want to work with other scientists to build a 24-meter-long test vacuum tube and a full-scale prototype of the passenger shuttle.

Speed is not the only issue for the group though. They also want to explore how the Hyperloop can become a safe, affordable, and sustainable means of transport for the future. In order to achieve this, they have developed, among other things, a levitation system for the ‘pod’ (the shuttle cabin in which passengers are transported through a vacuum tube) and also a prototype of a test vacuum tube made of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC).

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About the author

Author profile picture Petra Wiesmayer is a journalist and author who has conducted countless interviews with high-profile individuals and researched and written general entertainment, motorsports, and science articles for international publications. She is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.As an avid science fiction fan she is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.