© Elia Kaufmann

Since man has discovered flying, there are pilots who push the boundaries of physics with their planes and show what is possible in acrobatic maneuvers. The same applies to all types of remote-controlled model airplanes. And meanwhile also for drones. But all these companies have one thing in common: a human has to control the plane. Whether it’s directly from the cockpit or by remote control. Scientists from the University of Zurich now go one step further and allow drones to perform acrobatic maneuvers independently thanks to a navigation algorithm. They use simulations to train the autonomous aircraft, making them faster, more agile, and more efficient. This can be useful in rescue operations or even for delivery services.

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About the author

Author profile picture Petra Wiesmayer is a journalist and author who has conducted countless interviews with high-profile individuals and researched and written general entertainment, motorsports, and science articles for international publications. She is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.As an avid science fiction fan she is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.