© RUB, Kramer

The body’s immune system primarily fights viruses through antibodies and T lymphocytes (aka T cells). The antibodies bind to specific viral receptors and thereby prevent viruses from penetrating cells. At the same time, infected cells are tagged so that other protagonists in the immune system can then destroy the cell. Virus-specific T cells, on the other hand, are able to destroy infected cells directly.

In studies carried out during the past few weeks, these cell-killing SARS-Cov-2specific T cells were identified in patients who had gotten sick with COVID-19, triggered by the novel coronavirus. The results have revealed that these types of cells were mainly found in people who had survived a COVID-19 infection. “This suggests that these cells have a protective antiviral effect,” the scientists explain. On the other hand, some trials suggest that an overly robust immune response might be the cause of severe COVID-19 conditions. However, the role of SARS -Cov-2-specific T-cells in this overreaction is still unclear.

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About the author

Author profile picture Petra Wiesmayer is a journalist and author who has conducted countless interviews with high-profile individuals and researched and written general entertainment, motorsports, and science articles for international publications. She is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.As an avid science fiction fan she is fascinated by technology that could shape the future of mankind and enjoys reading and writing about it.