(c) Unsplash - Patrick Hendry

Governments are endeavouring to stem the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus (corona virus) by reducing person-to-person contact. The resulting ban on social activities has largely relegated the economy to the home office. This is also reflected in rush hour traffic, that’s undergoing a dramatic decline. Stephan Tischler from the Department of Infrastructure, Unit of Intelligent Transport Systems at the University of Innsbruck in Austria wonders if the COVID-19 crisis has the potential to change mobility behaviour over a sustained period.

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About the author

Author profile picture Hildegard Suntinger is a writer. She lives in Vienna as a freelance journalist and writes about all aspects of fashion production. She is interested in new trends in design, technology, and business. She is particularly excited about discovering interdisciplinary tendencies and the blurring of boundaries between different disciplines. The key element is technology, which changes all areas of life and work.