Detecting a hidden layer in a top work of art by Rembrandt, identifying metal fatigue in ships, predicting arteriosclerosis: these are just a few of the possible applications of Smart*Light, a synchrotron that fits on a table. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and Delft University of Technology will build and develop this X-ray source within a consortium of other universities and companies. The high-intensity X-ray beam that this device will produce is now only available via large, expensive and scarce facilities. A symposium on Tuesday 23 January gets the research project officially underway.

At the moment, researchers wanting to work with X-ray have just two options: a compact X-ray tube that emits uncontrolled X-rays in all directions or one of the 70 or so synchrotrons available worldwide – large facilities that produce X-rays with a highly precise direction and amount of energy, very expensively. The most powerful source in Europe is the ESRF in Grenoble.

Get full access to our archive by becoming a member of Innovation Origins. Sign up here as a supporter of independent journalism!

Become a member!

On Innovation Origins you can read the latest news about the world of innovation every day. We want to keep it that way, but we can't do it alone! Are you enjoying our articles and would you like to support independent journalism? Become a member and read our stories guaranteed ad-free.

About the author

Author profile picture Frans van Beveren leads IO on a daily basis. He is fascinated by everything related to technical progress, innovation, sustainability, and industrial design.

Leave a Reply